ligayaharukadiwata:

ellidfics:

tisfan:

everyworldneedslove:

darthstitch:

markoruffalo:


What’s interesting about good and moral people is that they actually have to try and function in a word that isn’t. And the older you get, the more interesting that becomes. Because it’s also the hardest thing to do in the world. (x) (x)

#yes #yes this so very much #it’s easy to be an asshole in a world full of assholes #especially when you have/had a shit life and have/had some nasty shit happened to you #but to still be kind #not to waver #to stay who you are #is a very hard thing to do #it’s easy to love #and it’s easy to hate #but it takes strength to be gentle and kind #and this is why every single superhero in the marvel universe looks up to steve #clint said it himself #steve brings out the best out of people #when you’re around steve you want to do what’s right because of the sheer power of steve’s goodness #oh god  #steve i love you so much it actually pains me please send help

And this is why I love Steve Rogers and I refuse to buy into this crap that “writing Good Guys is boring” and “let’s grim him up a bit, make him more into Grim Brooding Dark Superhero Name Here, that’ll be interesting.” 
Writing Good Guys is never boring. 
The ridiculous thing about Steve Rogers is that he is everything that is brave, earnest and true.  And no, he’s not perfect, he’s not a saint, he’s sassy and snarky and occasionally trips face first into the Land of Adorkable. (All right, maybe not occasionally.  Maybe all the flippin’ time.)  But good is awesome.  Good rocks.  Good doesn’t mean soft and weak and boring.  
Doing the Right Thing is hard and it hurts like a sumbitch at times and you’ll get crap thrown at you every which way but Steve Rogers keeps going and somehow manages to stay kind and still be this sweetheart, despite everything else that would’ve broken other people long ago.  
Somehow you read about Steve being playful and pretending that he doesn’t understand modern technology but is probably the biggest techie geek there is.  You read about Steve saving puppies and kittens and telling a wide-eyed six year old girl that she can be Captain America when she grows up if she wants to be.  You read about Steve charming little old ladies and respecting the hell out of women in general and you can bet your ass he’s not some chauvinistic asshole with entitlement issues.  You read about skinny Steve and you realize Captain America’s always been in him, even when he didn’t have the strength to match that superhero heart of his.  You read about Steve trolling the hell out of his teammates and Tony goes “SON OF A BITCH WHO KNEW?!” and Clint cackles over and over because this is rich, this is awesome, Captain America’s a little trolling shit and PHIL DID YOU SEE THAT?
And Bucky would’ve told him, Steve’s always been a punk, didn’t you fellas know that? 
And the Howling Commandos would’ve had some stories about their crazy C.O. and the shenanigans he came up with and that Steve ran a mixed-race unit with a couple of soldiers from not even in the US ARMY and took no guff from anyone who complained about that. 
And Natasha doesn’t ever get disappointed in this good man, when she’s been disappointed by so many so called “good men” and she starts to believe.
And that’s the Steve Rogers story I’ll never get tired of reading.  Or writing. 
Fuck boring.  Steve Rogers will never be boring.  He’s my hero too. 

Did I reblog this already? I don’t care because IT GOT BETTER.

“Imaginary evil is romantic and varied; real evil is gloomy, monotonous, barren, boring. Imaginary good is boring; real good is always new, marvelous, intoxicating.”
― Simone Weil

Even better?  It’s not just MCU Steve that’s like this.  I’m reading some of the late 70’s/early 80’s issues right now, and what do we see but a Steve Rogers who spends two or three issues fighting a blockbuster who’s trying to burn Steve’s neighbors out of their homes so his employer can put up a shopping center - and the neighbors are a black special ed teacher, a Jewish glassblower, a white guy with a college degree who’s a firefighter because it’s the right thing to do, and a little old lady who’s a Holocaust survivor who was saved by Captain America in ‘45 (and doesn’t know who he is because he kept his mask on).  Later in the run he reestablishes contact with a childhood friend who’s gay and living with his boyfriend, and not only does Steve not recoil in horror, he defends their love as every bit as valid and worthy of respect as his relationship with his girlfriend. 
And the issues aren’t boring, and Steve isn’t a self-righteous goody-goody.  He blows his deadlines at work (he’s a freelance artist), he makes a fool of himself a couple of time romancing the pretty glassblower, he makes mistakes, he’s guilt-stricken because he let Bucky AND a poor guy named Roscoe who tried to sub for him as Cap die, and he makes mistakes.  It’s sweet and funny and yes, it’s clearly for kids and younger teens, but you know what?  These issues are well written and drawn, and as dated as they are in some ways, they’re so much more enjoyable than the grim, bitter wreck we see in the current comics, or the neocon jerkwad from Ults. 
Maybe, just maybe, the comics industry needs to remember to let their good guys be good for a change. 

This, so much! EXACTLY THIS!
Zoom Info
ligayaharukadiwata:

ellidfics:

tisfan:

everyworldneedslove:

darthstitch:

markoruffalo:


What’s interesting about good and moral people is that they actually have to try and function in a word that isn’t. And the older you get, the more interesting that becomes. Because it’s also the hardest thing to do in the world. (x) (x)

#yes #yes this so very much #it’s easy to be an asshole in a world full of assholes #especially when you have/had a shit life and have/had some nasty shit happened to you #but to still be kind #not to waver #to stay who you are #is a very hard thing to do #it’s easy to love #and it’s easy to hate #but it takes strength to be gentle and kind #and this is why every single superhero in the marvel universe looks up to steve #clint said it himself #steve brings out the best out of people #when you’re around steve you want to do what’s right because of the sheer power of steve’s goodness #oh god  #steve i love you so much it actually pains me please send help

And this is why I love Steve Rogers and I refuse to buy into this crap that “writing Good Guys is boring” and “let’s grim him up a bit, make him more into Grim Brooding Dark Superhero Name Here, that’ll be interesting.” 
Writing Good Guys is never boring. 
The ridiculous thing about Steve Rogers is that he is everything that is brave, earnest and true.  And no, he’s not perfect, he’s not a saint, he’s sassy and snarky and occasionally trips face first into the Land of Adorkable. (All right, maybe not occasionally.  Maybe all the flippin’ time.)  But good is awesome.  Good rocks.  Good doesn’t mean soft and weak and boring.  
Doing the Right Thing is hard and it hurts like a sumbitch at times and you’ll get crap thrown at you every which way but Steve Rogers keeps going and somehow manages to stay kind and still be this sweetheart, despite everything else that would’ve broken other people long ago.  
Somehow you read about Steve being playful and pretending that he doesn’t understand modern technology but is probably the biggest techie geek there is.  You read about Steve saving puppies and kittens and telling a wide-eyed six year old girl that she can be Captain America when she grows up if she wants to be.  You read about Steve charming little old ladies and respecting the hell out of women in general and you can bet your ass he’s not some chauvinistic asshole with entitlement issues.  You read about skinny Steve and you realize Captain America’s always been in him, even when he didn’t have the strength to match that superhero heart of his.  You read about Steve trolling the hell out of his teammates and Tony goes “SON OF A BITCH WHO KNEW?!” and Clint cackles over and over because this is rich, this is awesome, Captain America’s a little trolling shit and PHIL DID YOU SEE THAT?
And Bucky would’ve told him, Steve’s always been a punk, didn’t you fellas know that? 
And the Howling Commandos would’ve had some stories about their crazy C.O. and the shenanigans he came up with and that Steve ran a mixed-race unit with a couple of soldiers from not even in the US ARMY and took no guff from anyone who complained about that. 
And Natasha doesn’t ever get disappointed in this good man, when she’s been disappointed by so many so called “good men” and she starts to believe.
And that’s the Steve Rogers story I’ll never get tired of reading.  Or writing. 
Fuck boring.  Steve Rogers will never be boring.  He’s my hero too. 

Did I reblog this already? I don’t care because IT GOT BETTER.

“Imaginary evil is romantic and varied; real evil is gloomy, monotonous, barren, boring. Imaginary good is boring; real good is always new, marvelous, intoxicating.”
― Simone Weil

Even better?  It’s not just MCU Steve that’s like this.  I’m reading some of the late 70’s/early 80’s issues right now, and what do we see but a Steve Rogers who spends two or three issues fighting a blockbuster who’s trying to burn Steve’s neighbors out of their homes so his employer can put up a shopping center - and the neighbors are a black special ed teacher, a Jewish glassblower, a white guy with a college degree who’s a firefighter because it’s the right thing to do, and a little old lady who’s a Holocaust survivor who was saved by Captain America in ‘45 (and doesn’t know who he is because he kept his mask on).  Later in the run he reestablishes contact with a childhood friend who’s gay and living with his boyfriend, and not only does Steve not recoil in horror, he defends their love as every bit as valid and worthy of respect as his relationship with his girlfriend. 
And the issues aren’t boring, and Steve isn’t a self-righteous goody-goody.  He blows his deadlines at work (he’s a freelance artist), he makes a fool of himself a couple of time romancing the pretty glassblower, he makes mistakes, he’s guilt-stricken because he let Bucky AND a poor guy named Roscoe who tried to sub for him as Cap die, and he makes mistakes.  It’s sweet and funny and yes, it’s clearly for kids and younger teens, but you know what?  These issues are well written and drawn, and as dated as they are in some ways, they’re so much more enjoyable than the grim, bitter wreck we see in the current comics, or the neocon jerkwad from Ults. 
Maybe, just maybe, the comics industry needs to remember to let their good guys be good for a change. 

This, so much! EXACTLY THIS!
Zoom Info
ligayaharukadiwata:

ellidfics:

tisfan:

everyworldneedslove:

darthstitch:

markoruffalo:


What’s interesting about good and moral people is that they actually have to try and function in a word that isn’t. And the older you get, the more interesting that becomes. Because it’s also the hardest thing to do in the world. (x) (x)

#yes #yes this so very much #it’s easy to be an asshole in a world full of assholes #especially when you have/had a shit life and have/had some nasty shit happened to you #but to still be kind #not to waver #to stay who you are #is a very hard thing to do #it’s easy to love #and it’s easy to hate #but it takes strength to be gentle and kind #and this is why every single superhero in the marvel universe looks up to steve #clint said it himself #steve brings out the best out of people #when you’re around steve you want to do what’s right because of the sheer power of steve’s goodness #oh god  #steve i love you so much it actually pains me please send help

And this is why I love Steve Rogers and I refuse to buy into this crap that “writing Good Guys is boring” and “let’s grim him up a bit, make him more into Grim Brooding Dark Superhero Name Here, that’ll be interesting.” 
Writing Good Guys is never boring. 
The ridiculous thing about Steve Rogers is that he is everything that is brave, earnest and true.  And no, he’s not perfect, he’s not a saint, he’s sassy and snarky and occasionally trips face first into the Land of Adorkable. (All right, maybe not occasionally.  Maybe all the flippin’ time.)  But good is awesome.  Good rocks.  Good doesn’t mean soft and weak and boring.  
Doing the Right Thing is hard and it hurts like a sumbitch at times and you’ll get crap thrown at you every which way but Steve Rogers keeps going and somehow manages to stay kind and still be this sweetheart, despite everything else that would’ve broken other people long ago.  
Somehow you read about Steve being playful and pretending that he doesn’t understand modern technology but is probably the biggest techie geek there is.  You read about Steve saving puppies and kittens and telling a wide-eyed six year old girl that she can be Captain America when she grows up if she wants to be.  You read about Steve charming little old ladies and respecting the hell out of women in general and you can bet your ass he’s not some chauvinistic asshole with entitlement issues.  You read about skinny Steve and you realize Captain America’s always been in him, even when he didn’t have the strength to match that superhero heart of his.  You read about Steve trolling the hell out of his teammates and Tony goes “SON OF A BITCH WHO KNEW?!” and Clint cackles over and over because this is rich, this is awesome, Captain America’s a little trolling shit and PHIL DID YOU SEE THAT?
And Bucky would’ve told him, Steve’s always been a punk, didn’t you fellas know that? 
And the Howling Commandos would’ve had some stories about their crazy C.O. and the shenanigans he came up with and that Steve ran a mixed-race unit with a couple of soldiers from not even in the US ARMY and took no guff from anyone who complained about that. 
And Natasha doesn’t ever get disappointed in this good man, when she’s been disappointed by so many so called “good men” and she starts to believe.
And that’s the Steve Rogers story I’ll never get tired of reading.  Or writing. 
Fuck boring.  Steve Rogers will never be boring.  He’s my hero too. 

Did I reblog this already? I don’t care because IT GOT BETTER.

“Imaginary evil is romantic and varied; real evil is gloomy, monotonous, barren, boring. Imaginary good is boring; real good is always new, marvelous, intoxicating.”
― Simone Weil

Even better?  It’s not just MCU Steve that’s like this.  I’m reading some of the late 70’s/early 80’s issues right now, and what do we see but a Steve Rogers who spends two or three issues fighting a blockbuster who’s trying to burn Steve’s neighbors out of their homes so his employer can put up a shopping center - and the neighbors are a black special ed teacher, a Jewish glassblower, a white guy with a college degree who’s a firefighter because it’s the right thing to do, and a little old lady who’s a Holocaust survivor who was saved by Captain America in ‘45 (and doesn’t know who he is because he kept his mask on).  Later in the run he reestablishes contact with a childhood friend who’s gay and living with his boyfriend, and not only does Steve not recoil in horror, he defends their love as every bit as valid and worthy of respect as his relationship with his girlfriend. 
And the issues aren’t boring, and Steve isn’t a self-righteous goody-goody.  He blows his deadlines at work (he’s a freelance artist), he makes a fool of himself a couple of time romancing the pretty glassblower, he makes mistakes, he’s guilt-stricken because he let Bucky AND a poor guy named Roscoe who tried to sub for him as Cap die, and he makes mistakes.  It’s sweet and funny and yes, it’s clearly for kids and younger teens, but you know what?  These issues are well written and drawn, and as dated as they are in some ways, they’re so much more enjoyable than the grim, bitter wreck we see in the current comics, or the neocon jerkwad from Ults. 
Maybe, just maybe, the comics industry needs to remember to let their good guys be good for a change. 

This, so much! EXACTLY THIS!
Zoom Info
ligayaharukadiwata:

ellidfics:

tisfan:

everyworldneedslove:

darthstitch:

markoruffalo:


What’s interesting about good and moral people is that they actually have to try and function in a word that isn’t. And the older you get, the more interesting that becomes. Because it’s also the hardest thing to do in the world. (x) (x)

#yes #yes this so very much #it’s easy to be an asshole in a world full of assholes #especially when you have/had a shit life and have/had some nasty shit happened to you #but to still be kind #not to waver #to stay who you are #is a very hard thing to do #it’s easy to love #and it’s easy to hate #but it takes strength to be gentle and kind #and this is why every single superhero in the marvel universe looks up to steve #clint said it himself #steve brings out the best out of people #when you’re around steve you want to do what’s right because of the sheer power of steve’s goodness #oh god  #steve i love you so much it actually pains me please send help

And this is why I love Steve Rogers and I refuse to buy into this crap that “writing Good Guys is boring” and “let’s grim him up a bit, make him more into Grim Brooding Dark Superhero Name Here, that’ll be interesting.” 
Writing Good Guys is never boring. 
The ridiculous thing about Steve Rogers is that he is everything that is brave, earnest and true.  And no, he’s not perfect, he’s not a saint, he’s sassy and snarky and occasionally trips face first into the Land of Adorkable. (All right, maybe not occasionally.  Maybe all the flippin’ time.)  But good is awesome.  Good rocks.  Good doesn’t mean soft and weak and boring.  
Doing the Right Thing is hard and it hurts like a sumbitch at times and you’ll get crap thrown at you every which way but Steve Rogers keeps going and somehow manages to stay kind and still be this sweetheart, despite everything else that would’ve broken other people long ago.  
Somehow you read about Steve being playful and pretending that he doesn’t understand modern technology but is probably the biggest techie geek there is.  You read about Steve saving puppies and kittens and telling a wide-eyed six year old girl that she can be Captain America when she grows up if she wants to be.  You read about Steve charming little old ladies and respecting the hell out of women in general and you can bet your ass he’s not some chauvinistic asshole with entitlement issues.  You read about skinny Steve and you realize Captain America’s always been in him, even when he didn’t have the strength to match that superhero heart of his.  You read about Steve trolling the hell out of his teammates and Tony goes “SON OF A BITCH WHO KNEW?!” and Clint cackles over and over because this is rich, this is awesome, Captain America’s a little trolling shit and PHIL DID YOU SEE THAT?
And Bucky would’ve told him, Steve’s always been a punk, didn’t you fellas know that? 
And the Howling Commandos would’ve had some stories about their crazy C.O. and the shenanigans he came up with and that Steve ran a mixed-race unit with a couple of soldiers from not even in the US ARMY and took no guff from anyone who complained about that. 
And Natasha doesn’t ever get disappointed in this good man, when she’s been disappointed by so many so called “good men” and she starts to believe.
And that’s the Steve Rogers story I’ll never get tired of reading.  Or writing. 
Fuck boring.  Steve Rogers will never be boring.  He’s my hero too. 

Did I reblog this already? I don’t care because IT GOT BETTER.

“Imaginary evil is romantic and varied; real evil is gloomy, monotonous, barren, boring. Imaginary good is boring; real good is always new, marvelous, intoxicating.”
― Simone Weil

Even better?  It’s not just MCU Steve that’s like this.  I’m reading some of the late 70’s/early 80’s issues right now, and what do we see but a Steve Rogers who spends two or three issues fighting a blockbuster who’s trying to burn Steve’s neighbors out of their homes so his employer can put up a shopping center - and the neighbors are a black special ed teacher, a Jewish glassblower, a white guy with a college degree who’s a firefighter because it’s the right thing to do, and a little old lady who’s a Holocaust survivor who was saved by Captain America in ‘45 (and doesn’t know who he is because he kept his mask on).  Later in the run he reestablishes contact with a childhood friend who’s gay and living with his boyfriend, and not only does Steve not recoil in horror, he defends their love as every bit as valid and worthy of respect as his relationship with his girlfriend. 
And the issues aren’t boring, and Steve isn’t a self-righteous goody-goody.  He blows his deadlines at work (he’s a freelance artist), he makes a fool of himself a couple of time romancing the pretty glassblower, he makes mistakes, he’s guilt-stricken because he let Bucky AND a poor guy named Roscoe who tried to sub for him as Cap die, and he makes mistakes.  It’s sweet and funny and yes, it’s clearly for kids and younger teens, but you know what?  These issues are well written and drawn, and as dated as they are in some ways, they’re so much more enjoyable than the grim, bitter wreck we see in the current comics, or the neocon jerkwad from Ults. 
Maybe, just maybe, the comics industry needs to remember to let their good guys be good for a change. 

This, so much! EXACTLY THIS!
Zoom Info
ligayaharukadiwata:

ellidfics:

tisfan:

everyworldneedslove:

darthstitch:

markoruffalo:


What’s interesting about good and moral people is that they actually have to try and function in a word that isn’t. And the older you get, the more interesting that becomes. Because it’s also the hardest thing to do in the world. (x) (x)

#yes #yes this so very much #it’s easy to be an asshole in a world full of assholes #especially when you have/had a shit life and have/had some nasty shit happened to you #but to still be kind #not to waver #to stay who you are #is a very hard thing to do #it’s easy to love #and it’s easy to hate #but it takes strength to be gentle and kind #and this is why every single superhero in the marvel universe looks up to steve #clint said it himself #steve brings out the best out of people #when you’re around steve you want to do what’s right because of the sheer power of steve’s goodness #oh god  #steve i love you so much it actually pains me please send help

And this is why I love Steve Rogers and I refuse to buy into this crap that “writing Good Guys is boring” and “let’s grim him up a bit, make him more into Grim Brooding Dark Superhero Name Here, that’ll be interesting.” 
Writing Good Guys is never boring. 
The ridiculous thing about Steve Rogers is that he is everything that is brave, earnest and true.  And no, he’s not perfect, he’s not a saint, he’s sassy and snarky and occasionally trips face first into the Land of Adorkable. (All right, maybe not occasionally.  Maybe all the flippin’ time.)  But good is awesome.  Good rocks.  Good doesn’t mean soft and weak and boring.  
Doing the Right Thing is hard and it hurts like a sumbitch at times and you’ll get crap thrown at you every which way but Steve Rogers keeps going and somehow manages to stay kind and still be this sweetheart, despite everything else that would’ve broken other people long ago.  
Somehow you read about Steve being playful and pretending that he doesn’t understand modern technology but is probably the biggest techie geek there is.  You read about Steve saving puppies and kittens and telling a wide-eyed six year old girl that she can be Captain America when she grows up if she wants to be.  You read about Steve charming little old ladies and respecting the hell out of women in general and you can bet your ass he’s not some chauvinistic asshole with entitlement issues.  You read about skinny Steve and you realize Captain America’s always been in him, even when he didn’t have the strength to match that superhero heart of his.  You read about Steve trolling the hell out of his teammates and Tony goes “SON OF A BITCH WHO KNEW?!” and Clint cackles over and over because this is rich, this is awesome, Captain America’s a little trolling shit and PHIL DID YOU SEE THAT?
And Bucky would’ve told him, Steve’s always been a punk, didn’t you fellas know that? 
And the Howling Commandos would’ve had some stories about their crazy C.O. and the shenanigans he came up with and that Steve ran a mixed-race unit with a couple of soldiers from not even in the US ARMY and took no guff from anyone who complained about that. 
And Natasha doesn’t ever get disappointed in this good man, when she’s been disappointed by so many so called “good men” and she starts to believe.
And that’s the Steve Rogers story I’ll never get tired of reading.  Or writing. 
Fuck boring.  Steve Rogers will never be boring.  He’s my hero too. 

Did I reblog this already? I don’t care because IT GOT BETTER.

“Imaginary evil is romantic and varied; real evil is gloomy, monotonous, barren, boring. Imaginary good is boring; real good is always new, marvelous, intoxicating.”
― Simone Weil

Even better?  It’s not just MCU Steve that’s like this.  I’m reading some of the late 70’s/early 80’s issues right now, and what do we see but a Steve Rogers who spends two or three issues fighting a blockbuster who’s trying to burn Steve’s neighbors out of their homes so his employer can put up a shopping center - and the neighbors are a black special ed teacher, a Jewish glassblower, a white guy with a college degree who’s a firefighter because it’s the right thing to do, and a little old lady who’s a Holocaust survivor who was saved by Captain America in ‘45 (and doesn’t know who he is because he kept his mask on).  Later in the run he reestablishes contact with a childhood friend who’s gay and living with his boyfriend, and not only does Steve not recoil in horror, he defends their love as every bit as valid and worthy of respect as his relationship with his girlfriend. 
And the issues aren’t boring, and Steve isn’t a self-righteous goody-goody.  He blows his deadlines at work (he’s a freelance artist), he makes a fool of himself a couple of time romancing the pretty glassblower, he makes mistakes, he’s guilt-stricken because he let Bucky AND a poor guy named Roscoe who tried to sub for him as Cap die, and he makes mistakes.  It’s sweet and funny and yes, it’s clearly for kids and younger teens, but you know what?  These issues are well written and drawn, and as dated as they are in some ways, they’re so much more enjoyable than the grim, bitter wreck we see in the current comics, or the neocon jerkwad from Ults. 
Maybe, just maybe, the comics industry needs to remember to let their good guys be good for a change. 

This, so much! EXACTLY THIS!
Zoom Info
ligayaharukadiwata:

ellidfics:

tisfan:

everyworldneedslove:

darthstitch:

markoruffalo:


What’s interesting about good and moral people is that they actually have to try and function in a word that isn’t. And the older you get, the more interesting that becomes. Because it’s also the hardest thing to do in the world. (x) (x)

#yes #yes this so very much #it’s easy to be an asshole in a world full of assholes #especially when you have/had a shit life and have/had some nasty shit happened to you #but to still be kind #not to waver #to stay who you are #is a very hard thing to do #it’s easy to love #and it’s easy to hate #but it takes strength to be gentle and kind #and this is why every single superhero in the marvel universe looks up to steve #clint said it himself #steve brings out the best out of people #when you’re around steve you want to do what’s right because of the sheer power of steve’s goodness #oh god  #steve i love you so much it actually pains me please send help

And this is why I love Steve Rogers and I refuse to buy into this crap that “writing Good Guys is boring” and “let’s grim him up a bit, make him more into Grim Brooding Dark Superhero Name Here, that’ll be interesting.” 
Writing Good Guys is never boring. 
The ridiculous thing about Steve Rogers is that he is everything that is brave, earnest and true.  And no, he’s not perfect, he’s not a saint, he’s sassy and snarky and occasionally trips face first into the Land of Adorkable. (All right, maybe not occasionally.  Maybe all the flippin’ time.)  But good is awesome.  Good rocks.  Good doesn’t mean soft and weak and boring.  
Doing the Right Thing is hard and it hurts like a sumbitch at times and you’ll get crap thrown at you every which way but Steve Rogers keeps going and somehow manages to stay kind and still be this sweetheart, despite everything else that would’ve broken other people long ago.  
Somehow you read about Steve being playful and pretending that he doesn’t understand modern technology but is probably the biggest techie geek there is.  You read about Steve saving puppies and kittens and telling a wide-eyed six year old girl that she can be Captain America when she grows up if she wants to be.  You read about Steve charming little old ladies and respecting the hell out of women in general and you can bet your ass he’s not some chauvinistic asshole with entitlement issues.  You read about skinny Steve and you realize Captain America’s always been in him, even when he didn’t have the strength to match that superhero heart of his.  You read about Steve trolling the hell out of his teammates and Tony goes “SON OF A BITCH WHO KNEW?!” and Clint cackles over and over because this is rich, this is awesome, Captain America’s a little trolling shit and PHIL DID YOU SEE THAT?
And Bucky would’ve told him, Steve’s always been a punk, didn’t you fellas know that? 
And the Howling Commandos would’ve had some stories about their crazy C.O. and the shenanigans he came up with and that Steve ran a mixed-race unit with a couple of soldiers from not even in the US ARMY and took no guff from anyone who complained about that. 
And Natasha doesn’t ever get disappointed in this good man, when she’s been disappointed by so many so called “good men” and she starts to believe.
And that’s the Steve Rogers story I’ll never get tired of reading.  Or writing. 
Fuck boring.  Steve Rogers will never be boring.  He’s my hero too. 

Did I reblog this already? I don’t care because IT GOT BETTER.

“Imaginary evil is romantic and varied; real evil is gloomy, monotonous, barren, boring. Imaginary good is boring; real good is always new, marvelous, intoxicating.”
― Simone Weil

Even better?  It’s not just MCU Steve that’s like this.  I’m reading some of the late 70’s/early 80’s issues right now, and what do we see but a Steve Rogers who spends two or three issues fighting a blockbuster who’s trying to burn Steve’s neighbors out of their homes so his employer can put up a shopping center - and the neighbors are a black special ed teacher, a Jewish glassblower, a white guy with a college degree who’s a firefighter because it’s the right thing to do, and a little old lady who’s a Holocaust survivor who was saved by Captain America in ‘45 (and doesn’t know who he is because he kept his mask on).  Later in the run he reestablishes contact with a childhood friend who’s gay and living with his boyfriend, and not only does Steve not recoil in horror, he defends their love as every bit as valid and worthy of respect as his relationship with his girlfriend. 
And the issues aren’t boring, and Steve isn’t a self-righteous goody-goody.  He blows his deadlines at work (he’s a freelance artist), he makes a fool of himself a couple of time romancing the pretty glassblower, he makes mistakes, he’s guilt-stricken because he let Bucky AND a poor guy named Roscoe who tried to sub for him as Cap die, and he makes mistakes.  It’s sweet and funny and yes, it’s clearly for kids and younger teens, but you know what?  These issues are well written and drawn, and as dated as they are in some ways, they’re so much more enjoyable than the grim, bitter wreck we see in the current comics, or the neocon jerkwad from Ults. 
Maybe, just maybe, the comics industry needs to remember to let their good guys be good for a change. 

This, so much! EXACTLY THIS!
Zoom Info
ligayaharukadiwata:

ellidfics:

tisfan:

everyworldneedslove:

darthstitch:

markoruffalo:


What’s interesting about good and moral people is that they actually have to try and function in a word that isn’t. And the older you get, the more interesting that becomes. Because it’s also the hardest thing to do in the world. (x) (x)

#yes #yes this so very much #it’s easy to be an asshole in a world full of assholes #especially when you have/had a shit life and have/had some nasty shit happened to you #but to still be kind #not to waver #to stay who you are #is a very hard thing to do #it’s easy to love #and it’s easy to hate #but it takes strength to be gentle and kind #and this is why every single superhero in the marvel universe looks up to steve #clint said it himself #steve brings out the best out of people #when you’re around steve you want to do what’s right because of the sheer power of steve’s goodness #oh god  #steve i love you so much it actually pains me please send help

And this is why I love Steve Rogers and I refuse to buy into this crap that “writing Good Guys is boring” and “let’s grim him up a bit, make him more into Grim Brooding Dark Superhero Name Here, that’ll be interesting.” 
Writing Good Guys is never boring. 
The ridiculous thing about Steve Rogers is that he is everything that is brave, earnest and true.  And no, he’s not perfect, he’s not a saint, he’s sassy and snarky and occasionally trips face first into the Land of Adorkable. (All right, maybe not occasionally.  Maybe all the flippin’ time.)  But good is awesome.  Good rocks.  Good doesn’t mean soft and weak and boring.  
Doing the Right Thing is hard and it hurts like a sumbitch at times and you’ll get crap thrown at you every which way but Steve Rogers keeps going and somehow manages to stay kind and still be this sweetheart, despite everything else that would’ve broken other people long ago.  
Somehow you read about Steve being playful and pretending that he doesn’t understand modern technology but is probably the biggest techie geek there is.  You read about Steve saving puppies and kittens and telling a wide-eyed six year old girl that she can be Captain America when she grows up if she wants to be.  You read about Steve charming little old ladies and respecting the hell out of women in general and you can bet your ass he’s not some chauvinistic asshole with entitlement issues.  You read about skinny Steve and you realize Captain America’s always been in him, even when he didn’t have the strength to match that superhero heart of his.  You read about Steve trolling the hell out of his teammates and Tony goes “SON OF A BITCH WHO KNEW?!” and Clint cackles over and over because this is rich, this is awesome, Captain America’s a little trolling shit and PHIL DID YOU SEE THAT?
And Bucky would’ve told him, Steve’s always been a punk, didn’t you fellas know that? 
And the Howling Commandos would’ve had some stories about their crazy C.O. and the shenanigans he came up with and that Steve ran a mixed-race unit with a couple of soldiers from not even in the US ARMY and took no guff from anyone who complained about that. 
And Natasha doesn’t ever get disappointed in this good man, when she’s been disappointed by so many so called “good men” and she starts to believe.
And that’s the Steve Rogers story I’ll never get tired of reading.  Or writing. 
Fuck boring.  Steve Rogers will never be boring.  He’s my hero too. 

Did I reblog this already? I don’t care because IT GOT BETTER.

“Imaginary evil is romantic and varied; real evil is gloomy, monotonous, barren, boring. Imaginary good is boring; real good is always new, marvelous, intoxicating.”
― Simone Weil

Even better?  It’s not just MCU Steve that’s like this.  I’m reading some of the late 70’s/early 80’s issues right now, and what do we see but a Steve Rogers who spends two or three issues fighting a blockbuster who’s trying to burn Steve’s neighbors out of their homes so his employer can put up a shopping center - and the neighbors are a black special ed teacher, a Jewish glassblower, a white guy with a college degree who’s a firefighter because it’s the right thing to do, and a little old lady who’s a Holocaust survivor who was saved by Captain America in ‘45 (and doesn’t know who he is because he kept his mask on).  Later in the run he reestablishes contact with a childhood friend who’s gay and living with his boyfriend, and not only does Steve not recoil in horror, he defends their love as every bit as valid and worthy of respect as his relationship with his girlfriend. 
And the issues aren’t boring, and Steve isn’t a self-righteous goody-goody.  He blows his deadlines at work (he’s a freelance artist), he makes a fool of himself a couple of time romancing the pretty glassblower, he makes mistakes, he’s guilt-stricken because he let Bucky AND a poor guy named Roscoe who tried to sub for him as Cap die, and he makes mistakes.  It’s sweet and funny and yes, it’s clearly for kids and younger teens, but you know what?  These issues are well written and drawn, and as dated as they are in some ways, they’re so much more enjoyable than the grim, bitter wreck we see in the current comics, or the neocon jerkwad from Ults. 
Maybe, just maybe, the comics industry needs to remember to let their good guys be good for a change. 

This, so much! EXACTLY THIS!
Zoom Info
ligayaharukadiwata:

ellidfics:

tisfan:

everyworldneedslove:

darthstitch:

markoruffalo:


What’s interesting about good and moral people is that they actually have to try and function in a word that isn’t. And the older you get, the more interesting that becomes. Because it’s also the hardest thing to do in the world. (x) (x)

#yes #yes this so very much #it’s easy to be an asshole in a world full of assholes #especially when you have/had a shit life and have/had some nasty shit happened to you #but to still be kind #not to waver #to stay who you are #is a very hard thing to do #it’s easy to love #and it’s easy to hate #but it takes strength to be gentle and kind #and this is why every single superhero in the marvel universe looks up to steve #clint said it himself #steve brings out the best out of people #when you’re around steve you want to do what’s right because of the sheer power of steve’s goodness #oh god  #steve i love you so much it actually pains me please send help

And this is why I love Steve Rogers and I refuse to buy into this crap that “writing Good Guys is boring” and “let’s grim him up a bit, make him more into Grim Brooding Dark Superhero Name Here, that’ll be interesting.” 
Writing Good Guys is never boring. 
The ridiculous thing about Steve Rogers is that he is everything that is brave, earnest and true.  And no, he’s not perfect, he’s not a saint, he’s sassy and snarky and occasionally trips face first into the Land of Adorkable. (All right, maybe not occasionally.  Maybe all the flippin’ time.)  But good is awesome.  Good rocks.  Good doesn’t mean soft and weak and boring.  
Doing the Right Thing is hard and it hurts like a sumbitch at times and you’ll get crap thrown at you every which way but Steve Rogers keeps going and somehow manages to stay kind and still be this sweetheart, despite everything else that would’ve broken other people long ago.  
Somehow you read about Steve being playful and pretending that he doesn’t understand modern technology but is probably the biggest techie geek there is.  You read about Steve saving puppies and kittens and telling a wide-eyed six year old girl that she can be Captain America when she grows up if she wants to be.  You read about Steve charming little old ladies and respecting the hell out of women in general and you can bet your ass he’s not some chauvinistic asshole with entitlement issues.  You read about skinny Steve and you realize Captain America’s always been in him, even when he didn’t have the strength to match that superhero heart of his.  You read about Steve trolling the hell out of his teammates and Tony goes “SON OF A BITCH WHO KNEW?!” and Clint cackles over and over because this is rich, this is awesome, Captain America’s a little trolling shit and PHIL DID YOU SEE THAT?
And Bucky would’ve told him, Steve’s always been a punk, didn’t you fellas know that? 
And the Howling Commandos would’ve had some stories about their crazy C.O. and the shenanigans he came up with and that Steve ran a mixed-race unit with a couple of soldiers from not even in the US ARMY and took no guff from anyone who complained about that. 
And Natasha doesn’t ever get disappointed in this good man, when she’s been disappointed by so many so called “good men” and she starts to believe.
And that’s the Steve Rogers story I’ll never get tired of reading.  Or writing. 
Fuck boring.  Steve Rogers will never be boring.  He’s my hero too. 

Did I reblog this already? I don’t care because IT GOT BETTER.

“Imaginary evil is romantic and varied; real evil is gloomy, monotonous, barren, boring. Imaginary good is boring; real good is always new, marvelous, intoxicating.”
― Simone Weil

Even better?  It’s not just MCU Steve that’s like this.  I’m reading some of the late 70’s/early 80’s issues right now, and what do we see but a Steve Rogers who spends two or three issues fighting a blockbuster who’s trying to burn Steve’s neighbors out of their homes so his employer can put up a shopping center - and the neighbors are a black special ed teacher, a Jewish glassblower, a white guy with a college degree who’s a firefighter because it’s the right thing to do, and a little old lady who’s a Holocaust survivor who was saved by Captain America in ‘45 (and doesn’t know who he is because he kept his mask on).  Later in the run he reestablishes contact with a childhood friend who’s gay and living with his boyfriend, and not only does Steve not recoil in horror, he defends their love as every bit as valid and worthy of respect as his relationship with his girlfriend. 
And the issues aren’t boring, and Steve isn’t a self-righteous goody-goody.  He blows his deadlines at work (he’s a freelance artist), he makes a fool of himself a couple of time romancing the pretty glassblower, he makes mistakes, he’s guilt-stricken because he let Bucky AND a poor guy named Roscoe who tried to sub for him as Cap die, and he makes mistakes.  It’s sweet and funny and yes, it’s clearly for kids and younger teens, but you know what?  These issues are well written and drawn, and as dated as they are in some ways, they’re so much more enjoyable than the grim, bitter wreck we see in the current comics, or the neocon jerkwad from Ults. 
Maybe, just maybe, the comics industry needs to remember to let their good guys be good for a change. 

This, so much! EXACTLY THIS!
Zoom Info

ligayaharukadiwata:

ellidfics:

tisfan:

everyworldneedslove:

darthstitch:

markoruffalo:

What’s interesting about good and moral people is that they actually have to try and function in a word that isn’t. And the older you get, the more interesting that becomes. Because it’s also the hardest thing to do in the world. (x) (x)

#yes #yes this so very much #it’s easy to be an asshole in a world full of assholes #especially when you have/had a shit life and have/had some nasty shit happened to you #but to still be kind #not to waver #to stay who you are #is a very hard thing to do #it’s easy to love #and it’s easy to hate #but it takes strength to be gentle and kind #and this is why every single superhero in the marvel universe looks up to steve #clint said it himself #steve brings out the best out of people #when you’re around steve you want to do what’s right because of the sheer power of steve’s goodness #oh god  #steve i love you so much it actually pains me please send help

And this is why I love Steve Rogers and I refuse to buy into this crap that “writing Good Guys is boring” and “let’s grim him up a bit, make him more into Grim Brooding Dark Superhero Name Here, that’ll be interesting.” 

Writing Good Guys is never boring. 

The ridiculous thing about Steve Rogers is that he is everything that is brave, earnest and true.  And no, he’s not perfect, he’s not a saint, he’s sassy and snarky and occasionally trips face first into the Land of Adorkable. (All right, maybe not occasionally.  Maybe all the flippin’ time.)  But good is awesome.  Good rocks.  Good doesn’t mean soft and weak and boring.  

Doing the Right Thing is hard and it hurts like a sumbitch at times and you’ll get crap thrown at you every which way but Steve Rogers keeps going and somehow manages to stay kind and still be this sweetheart, despite everything else that would’ve broken other people long ago.  

Somehow you read about Steve being playful and pretending that he doesn’t understand modern technology but is probably the biggest techie geek there is.  You read about Steve saving puppies and kittens and telling a wide-eyed six year old girl that she can be Captain America when she grows up if she wants to be.  You read about Steve charming little old ladies and respecting the hell out of women in general and you can bet your ass he’s not some chauvinistic asshole with entitlement issues.  You read about skinny Steve and you realize Captain America’s always been in him, even when he didn’t have the strength to match that superhero heart of his.  You read about Steve trolling the hell out of his teammates and Tony goes “SON OF A BITCH WHO KNEW?!” and Clint cackles over and over because this is rich, this is awesome, Captain America’s a little trolling shit and PHIL DID YOU SEE THAT?

And Bucky would’ve told him, Steve’s always been a punk, didn’t you fellas know that?

And the Howling Commandos would’ve had some stories about their crazy C.O. and the shenanigans he came up with and that Steve ran a mixed-race unit with a couple of soldiers from not even in the US ARMY and took no guff from anyone who complained about that

And Natasha doesn’t ever get disappointed in this good man, when she’s been disappointed by so many so called “good men” and she starts to believe.

And that’s the Steve Rogers story I’ll never get tired of reading.  Or writing. 

Fuck boring.  Steve Rogers will never be boring.  He’s my hero too. 

Did I reblog this already? I don’t care because IT GOT BETTER.

“Imaginary evil is romantic and varied; real evil is gloomy, monotonous, barren, boring. Imaginary good is boring; real good is always new, marvelous, intoxicating.”

― Simone Weil

Even better?  It’s not just MCU Steve that’s like this.  I’m reading some of the late 70’s/early 80’s issues right now, and what do we see but a Steve Rogers who spends two or three issues fighting a blockbuster who’s trying to burn Steve’s neighbors out of their homes so his employer can put up a shopping center - and the neighbors are a black special ed teacher, a Jewish glassblower, a white guy with a college degree who’s a firefighter because it’s the right thing to do, and a little old lady who’s a Holocaust survivor who was saved by Captain America in ‘45 (and doesn’t know who he is because he kept his mask on).  Later in the run he reestablishes contact with a childhood friend who’s gay and living with his boyfriend, and not only does Steve not recoil in horror, he defends their love as every bit as valid and worthy of respect as his relationship with his girlfriend. 

And the issues aren’t boring, and Steve isn’t a self-righteous goody-goody.  He blows his deadlines at work (he’s a freelance artist), he makes a fool of himself a couple of time romancing the pretty glassblower, he makes mistakes, he’s guilt-stricken because he let Bucky AND a poor guy named Roscoe who tried to sub for him as Cap die, and he makes mistakes.  It’s sweet and funny and yes, it’s clearly for kids and younger teens, but you know what?  These issues are well written and drawn, and as dated as they are in some ways, they’re so much more enjoyable than the grim, bitter wreck we see in the current comics, or the neocon jerkwad from Ults. 

Maybe, just maybe, the comics industry needs to remember to let their good guys be good for a change. 

This, so much! EXACTLY THIS!

marvelentertainment:

In celebration of Marvel Comics’ 75th Anniversary, Marvel proudly presents a deluxe collection of its 10 mightiest Masterworks hardcovers, plus the all-new, long-in-demand NOT BRAND ECHH VOL. 1 and the AVENGERS 75TH ANNIVERSARY BY ALEX ROSS POSTER signed by none other than Stan “The Man” Lee!
MARVEL FAMOUS FIRSTS: 75TH ANNIVERSARY MASTERWORKS SLIPCASE SETarrives in local comic book retailers September 3 and contains the following monumental Marvel collected moments:
CAPTAIN AMERICA VOL. 1 HC 264 pgs. - collecting Tales of Suspense #59-81 DAREDEVIL VOL. 1 HC 256 pgs. - collecting Daredevil #1-11 DOCTOR STRANGE VOL. 1 HC 328 pgs. - collecting Strange Tales #110-111 and  #114 - 141, and Amazing Spider-Man Annual  #2 NOT BRAND ECHH VOL. 1 HC 456 pgs. - collecting Not Brand Echh #1-13; and material from Amazing Spider-Man Annual #5, Avengers Annual #2, Daredevil Annual #1, Fantastic Four Annual  #5 and Sgt. Fury Annual #4. THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN VOL. 1 HC 272 pgs. – collecting Amazing Fantasy #15 and Amazing Spider-Man #1-10.
THE AVENGERS VOL. 1 HC 248 pgs. - collecting Avengers #1-10 THE FANTASTIC FOUR VOL. 1 HC 272 pgs. - collecting Fantastic Four #1-10 THE INCREDIBLE HULK VOL. 1 HC 176 pgs. - collecting Hulk #1-6 THE INVINCIBLE IRON MAN VOL. 1 HC 208 pgs. - collecting Tales of Suspense #39-50 THE MIGHTY THOR VOL. 1 HC 280 pgs. - collecting Journey into Mystery #83-100 THE X-MEN VOL. 1 HC 248 pgs. - collecting X-Men #1-10
For more on Marvel’s 75th Anniversary, please visit marvel.com/75, like us on Facebook at facebook.com/marvel and join in the conversation on Twitter with #marvel and don’t forget to follow us at @marvel.
Hardcover: 3,016 pages Language: English ISBN-10: 0785191283 ISBN-13: 978-0785191285 Product Dimensions: 19 x 16.8 x 13.5 inches Shipping Weight: 33.4 pounds On Sale: September, 3
Zoom Info
marvelentertainment:

In celebration of Marvel Comics’ 75th Anniversary, Marvel proudly presents a deluxe collection of its 10 mightiest Masterworks hardcovers, plus the all-new, long-in-demand NOT BRAND ECHH VOL. 1 and the AVENGERS 75TH ANNIVERSARY BY ALEX ROSS POSTER signed by none other than Stan “The Man” Lee!
MARVEL FAMOUS FIRSTS: 75TH ANNIVERSARY MASTERWORKS SLIPCASE SETarrives in local comic book retailers September 3 and contains the following monumental Marvel collected moments:
CAPTAIN AMERICA VOL. 1 HC 264 pgs. - collecting Tales of Suspense #59-81 DAREDEVIL VOL. 1 HC 256 pgs. - collecting Daredevil #1-11 DOCTOR STRANGE VOL. 1 HC 328 pgs. - collecting Strange Tales #110-111 and  #114 - 141, and Amazing Spider-Man Annual  #2 NOT BRAND ECHH VOL. 1 HC 456 pgs. - collecting Not Brand Echh #1-13; and material from Amazing Spider-Man Annual #5, Avengers Annual #2, Daredevil Annual #1, Fantastic Four Annual  #5 and Sgt. Fury Annual #4. THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN VOL. 1 HC 272 pgs. – collecting Amazing Fantasy #15 and Amazing Spider-Man #1-10.
THE AVENGERS VOL. 1 HC 248 pgs. - collecting Avengers #1-10 THE FANTASTIC FOUR VOL. 1 HC 272 pgs. - collecting Fantastic Four #1-10 THE INCREDIBLE HULK VOL. 1 HC 176 pgs. - collecting Hulk #1-6 THE INVINCIBLE IRON MAN VOL. 1 HC 208 pgs. - collecting Tales of Suspense #39-50 THE MIGHTY THOR VOL. 1 HC 280 pgs. - collecting Journey into Mystery #83-100 THE X-MEN VOL. 1 HC 248 pgs. - collecting X-Men #1-10
For more on Marvel’s 75th Anniversary, please visit marvel.com/75, like us on Facebook at facebook.com/marvel and join in the conversation on Twitter with #marvel and don’t forget to follow us at @marvel.
Hardcover: 3,016 pages Language: English ISBN-10: 0785191283 ISBN-13: 978-0785191285 Product Dimensions: 19 x 16.8 x 13.5 inches Shipping Weight: 33.4 pounds On Sale: September, 3
Zoom Info
marvelentertainment:

In celebration of Marvel Comics’ 75th Anniversary, Marvel proudly presents a deluxe collection of its 10 mightiest Masterworks hardcovers, plus the all-new, long-in-demand NOT BRAND ECHH VOL. 1 and the AVENGERS 75TH ANNIVERSARY BY ALEX ROSS POSTER signed by none other than Stan “The Man” Lee!
MARVEL FAMOUS FIRSTS: 75TH ANNIVERSARY MASTERWORKS SLIPCASE SETarrives in local comic book retailers September 3 and contains the following monumental Marvel collected moments:
CAPTAIN AMERICA VOL. 1 HC 264 pgs. - collecting Tales of Suspense #59-81 DAREDEVIL VOL. 1 HC 256 pgs. - collecting Daredevil #1-11 DOCTOR STRANGE VOL. 1 HC 328 pgs. - collecting Strange Tales #110-111 and  #114 - 141, and Amazing Spider-Man Annual  #2 NOT BRAND ECHH VOL. 1 HC 456 pgs. - collecting Not Brand Echh #1-13; and material from Amazing Spider-Man Annual #5, Avengers Annual #2, Daredevil Annual #1, Fantastic Four Annual  #5 and Sgt. Fury Annual #4. THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN VOL. 1 HC 272 pgs. – collecting Amazing Fantasy #15 and Amazing Spider-Man #1-10.
THE AVENGERS VOL. 1 HC 248 pgs. - collecting Avengers #1-10 THE FANTASTIC FOUR VOL. 1 HC 272 pgs. - collecting Fantastic Four #1-10 THE INCREDIBLE HULK VOL. 1 HC 176 pgs. - collecting Hulk #1-6 THE INVINCIBLE IRON MAN VOL. 1 HC 208 pgs. - collecting Tales of Suspense #39-50 THE MIGHTY THOR VOL. 1 HC 280 pgs. - collecting Journey into Mystery #83-100 THE X-MEN VOL. 1 HC 248 pgs. - collecting X-Men #1-10
For more on Marvel’s 75th Anniversary, please visit marvel.com/75, like us on Facebook at facebook.com/marvel and join in the conversation on Twitter with #marvel and don’t forget to follow us at @marvel.
Hardcover: 3,016 pages Language: English ISBN-10: 0785191283 ISBN-13: 978-0785191285 Product Dimensions: 19 x 16.8 x 13.5 inches Shipping Weight: 33.4 pounds On Sale: September, 3
Zoom Info
marvelentertainment:

In celebration of Marvel Comics’ 75th Anniversary, Marvel proudly presents a deluxe collection of its 10 mightiest Masterworks hardcovers, plus the all-new, long-in-demand NOT BRAND ECHH VOL. 1 and the AVENGERS 75TH ANNIVERSARY BY ALEX ROSS POSTER signed by none other than Stan “The Man” Lee!
MARVEL FAMOUS FIRSTS: 75TH ANNIVERSARY MASTERWORKS SLIPCASE SETarrives in local comic book retailers September 3 and contains the following monumental Marvel collected moments:
CAPTAIN AMERICA VOL. 1 HC 264 pgs. - collecting Tales of Suspense #59-81 DAREDEVIL VOL. 1 HC 256 pgs. - collecting Daredevil #1-11 DOCTOR STRANGE VOL. 1 HC 328 pgs. - collecting Strange Tales #110-111 and  #114 - 141, and Amazing Spider-Man Annual  #2 NOT BRAND ECHH VOL. 1 HC 456 pgs. - collecting Not Brand Echh #1-13; and material from Amazing Spider-Man Annual #5, Avengers Annual #2, Daredevil Annual #1, Fantastic Four Annual  #5 and Sgt. Fury Annual #4. THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN VOL. 1 HC 272 pgs. – collecting Amazing Fantasy #15 and Amazing Spider-Man #1-10.
THE AVENGERS VOL. 1 HC 248 pgs. - collecting Avengers #1-10 THE FANTASTIC FOUR VOL. 1 HC 272 pgs. - collecting Fantastic Four #1-10 THE INCREDIBLE HULK VOL. 1 HC 176 pgs. - collecting Hulk #1-6 THE INVINCIBLE IRON MAN VOL. 1 HC 208 pgs. - collecting Tales of Suspense #39-50 THE MIGHTY THOR VOL. 1 HC 280 pgs. - collecting Journey into Mystery #83-100 THE X-MEN VOL. 1 HC 248 pgs. - collecting X-Men #1-10
For more on Marvel’s 75th Anniversary, please visit marvel.com/75, like us on Facebook at facebook.com/marvel and join in the conversation on Twitter with #marvel and don’t forget to follow us at @marvel.
Hardcover: 3,016 pages Language: English ISBN-10: 0785191283 ISBN-13: 978-0785191285 Product Dimensions: 19 x 16.8 x 13.5 inches Shipping Weight: 33.4 pounds On Sale: September, 3
Zoom Info
marvelentertainment:

In celebration of Marvel Comics’ 75th Anniversary, Marvel proudly presents a deluxe collection of its 10 mightiest Masterworks hardcovers, plus the all-new, long-in-demand NOT BRAND ECHH VOL. 1 and the AVENGERS 75TH ANNIVERSARY BY ALEX ROSS POSTER signed by none other than Stan “The Man” Lee!
MARVEL FAMOUS FIRSTS: 75TH ANNIVERSARY MASTERWORKS SLIPCASE SETarrives in local comic book retailers September 3 and contains the following monumental Marvel collected moments:
CAPTAIN AMERICA VOL. 1 HC 264 pgs. - collecting Tales of Suspense #59-81 DAREDEVIL VOL. 1 HC 256 pgs. - collecting Daredevil #1-11 DOCTOR STRANGE VOL. 1 HC 328 pgs. - collecting Strange Tales #110-111 and  #114 - 141, and Amazing Spider-Man Annual  #2 NOT BRAND ECHH VOL. 1 HC 456 pgs. - collecting Not Brand Echh #1-13; and material from Amazing Spider-Man Annual #5, Avengers Annual #2, Daredevil Annual #1, Fantastic Four Annual  #5 and Sgt. Fury Annual #4. THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN VOL. 1 HC 272 pgs. – collecting Amazing Fantasy #15 and Amazing Spider-Man #1-10.
THE AVENGERS VOL. 1 HC 248 pgs. - collecting Avengers #1-10 THE FANTASTIC FOUR VOL. 1 HC 272 pgs. - collecting Fantastic Four #1-10 THE INCREDIBLE HULK VOL. 1 HC 176 pgs. - collecting Hulk #1-6 THE INVINCIBLE IRON MAN VOL. 1 HC 208 pgs. - collecting Tales of Suspense #39-50 THE MIGHTY THOR VOL. 1 HC 280 pgs. - collecting Journey into Mystery #83-100 THE X-MEN VOL. 1 HC 248 pgs. - collecting X-Men #1-10
For more on Marvel’s 75th Anniversary, please visit marvel.com/75, like us on Facebook at facebook.com/marvel and join in the conversation on Twitter with #marvel and don’t forget to follow us at @marvel.
Hardcover: 3,016 pages Language: English ISBN-10: 0785191283 ISBN-13: 978-0785191285 Product Dimensions: 19 x 16.8 x 13.5 inches Shipping Weight: 33.4 pounds On Sale: September, 3
Zoom Info

marvelentertainment:

In celebration of Marvel Comics’ 75th Anniversary, Marvel proudly presents a deluxe collection of its 10 mightiest Masterworks hardcovers, plus the all-new, long-in-demand NOT BRAND ECHH VOL. 1 and the AVENGERS 75TH ANNIVERSARY BY ALEX ROSS POSTER signed by none other than Stan “The Man” Lee!

MARVEL FAMOUS FIRSTS: 75TH ANNIVERSARY MASTERWORKS SLIPCASE SETarrives in local comic book retailers September 3 and contains the following monumental Marvel collected moments:

CAPTAIN AMERICA VOL. 1 HC
264 pgs. - collecting Tales of Suspense #59-81

DAREDEVIL VOL. 1 HC
256 pgs. - collecting Daredevil #1-11

DOCTOR STRANGE VOL. 1 HC
328 pgs. - collecting Strange Tales #110-111 and  #114 - 141, and Amazing Spider-Man Annual  #2

NOT BRAND ECHH VOL. 1 HC
456 pgs. - collecting Not Brand Echh #1-13; and material from Amazing Spider-Man Annual #5, Avengers Annual #2, Daredevil Annual #1, Fantastic Four Annual  #5 and Sgt. Fury Annual #4.

THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN VOL. 1 HC
272 pgs. – collecting Amazing Fantasy #15 and Amazing Spider-Man #1-10.

THE AVENGERS VOL. 1 HC
248 pgs. - collecting Avengers #1-10

THE FANTASTIC FOUR VOL. 1 HC
272 pgs. - collecting Fantastic Four #1-10

THE INCREDIBLE HULK VOL. 1 HC
176 pgs. - collecting Hulk #1-6

THE INVINCIBLE IRON MAN VOL. 1 HC
208 pgs. - collecting Tales of Suspense #39-50

THE MIGHTY THOR VOL. 1 HC
280 pgs. - collecting Journey into Mystery #83-100

THE X-MEN VOL. 1 HC
248 pgs. - collecting X-Men #1-10

For more on Marvel’s 75th Anniversary, please visit marvel.com/75, like us on Facebook at facebook.com/marvel and join in the conversation on Twitter with #marvel and don’t forget to follow us at @marvel.

Hardcover: 3,016 pages
Language: English
ISBN-10: 0785191283
ISBN-13: 978-0785191285
Product Dimensions: 19 x 16.8 x 13.5 inches
Shipping Weight: 33.4 pounds
On Sale: September, 3

you know, i’m sure marvel has a really good reason why there isn’t a black widow movie yet…

im-so-confused-about-everything:

you know, black widow is a hard character to write and it’s not like they have a script just lying around-

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well they can’t have had that for long-

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it’s been such a long time though, i’m sure he doesn’t still want to do it-

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well, it’s also not like there was ever another script in development before or anything-

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but does she have any history of working well with Marvel and writing a great movie with a plot that seemed like a hard sell-

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it’ll be hard to find a director though, that will have to bear the responsibility of directing the first Marvel female-led movie-

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but is she a strong character who has been established in several other hugely successful/well-received movies and played by one of the most bankable actresses in the world-

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then again, maybe she doesn’t even want to do a black widow movie-

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wow, so what the fans have to say actually matters?! that’s great! so they might listen to us and-

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but they do supposedly have movies planned up until 2028, we must at least be getting one black widow movie at some point-

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but wait-

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(x,x,x,x,x,x,x)

wolfofthemoon:

"They’re too close to be "just friends"!"

No

"Look! They care for each other! They must be in love!”

Stop

"They talk to each other  a lot! Its so cannon that they’re gay for each other!"

image

STOP DEVALUING FRIENDSHIPS!

ROMANCE/SEX IS NOT SUPERIOR TO FRIENDSHIP!

PEOPLE CAN LOVE AND CARE FOR EACH OTHER WITHOUT BEING ROMANTICALLY/SEXUALLY INVOLVED!

PLATONIC RELATIONSHIPS ARE NOT INFERIOR TO ROMANTIC/SEXUAL ONES!

cloudbackdrop:

Jamie Moriarty + Joan Watson  | I hate you but I also want you to pin me against the nearest wall and fuck me until I see jesus

Real Years & Years // Beggin’ for Thread Banks // Say My Name (Cyril Hahn Remix) Destiny’s Child // Brain Banks // Lights On FKA Twigs // When I’m Small Phantograms // Take Shelter Years & Years // You’re Not Good Enough Blood Orange // OctaHate Ryn Weaver // Four Floors Sunday Girl Vs. Diplo // BTSTU Jai Paul // About You XXYYXX // Mr. Quiche Wildcat! Wildcat! // Every Other Freckle alt-J // Intro The xx // Tennis Court (Flume Remix) Lorde // F**ckin Problem A$AP Rocky 
Listen Here


A mix for my Moriarty / Watson feelings (of which there are many ~I am large , I contain multitudes~) 

 

cloudbackdrop:

Jamie Moriarty + Joan Watson hate you but I also want you to pin me against the nearest wall and fuck me until I see jesus

Real Years & Years // Beggin’ for Thread Banks // Say My Name (Cyril Hahn Remix) Destiny’s Child // Brain Banks // Lights On FKA Twigs // When I’m Small Phantograms // Take Shelter Years & Years // You’re Not Good Enough Blood Orange // OctaHate Ryn Weaver // Four Floors Sunday Girl Vs. Diplo // BTSTU Jai Paul // About You XXYYXX // Mr. Quiche Wildcat! Wildcat! // Every Other Freckle alt-J // Intro The xx // Tennis Court (Flume Remix) Lorde // F**ckin Problem A$AP Rocky 

Listen Here

A mix for my Moriarty / Watson feelings (of which there are many ~I am large , I contain multitudes~)